News - Part 69

Gastric emptying scintigraphy: Prevalence of lower bowel dysfunction (Part 1)

Autonomic dysfunction is frequently observed in patients with MS, but clinical studies have shown contradictory findings regarding the frequency and type of abnormalities in autonomic function tests. In the present study, the gastric emptying rate was prolonged in MS patients compared with controls, as evidenced by the longer mean half-time in the former (P<0.05). This was consistent with the reports that document gastric dysfunction in patients with MS who presented with symptoms of delayed gastric emptying. Read more »

Gastric motility dysfunction assessed by gastric emptying scintigraphy

Gastric emptyingGastric emptying half-time and GIT symptoms. Visit the best pharmacy that thousands of international customers already chose to be their favorite one and see how easy it can be for you to get that flovent inhaler in the amount required for your treatment spending a lot less money than otherwise.

The mean half-time was greater in patients with constipation (64.4±23.2 min); nevertheless, there was no statistically significant difference between patients with constipation and patients without constipation (P=0.197). Moreover, although the mean half-time was lower in patients with fecal incontinence (49.9±16.8 min), there was no statistically significant difference when compared with those without fecal incontinence (P=0.654) (Table 1). Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Discussion (Part 5)

A possible explanation for this discordance in the results is the geographical variation in the diet, because, as shown by Lichtenberger et al , the surface active phospholipids are important determinants for gastric mucosal hydrophobicity. The present study highlights the fact that the hypothesis that H pylori causes peptic ulcers by reducing the mucosal layer hydrophobicity may not be valid . The decreased gastric hydrophobicity with H pylori infection reported in previous studies could possibly be the consequence of associated gastric diseases rather than the cause of it. Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Discussion (Part 4)

mouse-adapted H pylori strainIn a model of a mouse-adapted H pylori strain (SS1) used to infect C57BL/6 and gld mice, the contact angle readings were obtained by the ADSA-D technique. However, Lichtenberger et al reported reductions in the hydrophobicity of gastric mucosa following Helicobacter felis infection of C57BL/6 mice, and proposed that the reduction in surface hydrophobicity is an early event predisposing to the development of subsequent gastritis. Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Discussion (Part 3)

There are problems associated with using biopsy specimens . First, the biopsy size limits the volume of water droplets that can be formed on the mucus surface, thereby reducing the accuracy of the surface property determinations. Second, the biopsy surfaces are rough and heterogeneous, leading to the production of sessile drops. Finally, the trauma involved in obtaining endoscopic biopsies could disrupt the mucus surface and, hence, may not give a true indication of the in situ surface properties. Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Discussion (Part 2)

H pylori-infected patientsAsante et al observed that H pylori-infected patients with duodenal ulcer had lower gastric hydrophobicity than infected patients with gastritis alone, but it was not clear whether it was H pylori infection or the ulceration that initiated the reduction in hydrophobicity. Second, they did not age and sex match the patients and controls in their studies. Finally, they used a less precise method for contact angle measurements compared with the present study, which used computer software. In addition, these earlier studies did not differentiate between cagA+ and cagA-patients. Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Discussion (Part 1)

The measurement of contact angles in the determination of surface hydrophobicity, which is a biophysical property of tissue surfaces, yields values that closely agrees with those obtained by methods that do not rely on contact angles. Previous studies in humans have reported decreased gastric hydrophobicity with H pylori infection. In the present study, there was no significant difference in the mean contact angle (hydrophobicity) between age- and sex-matched H pylori-positive and H pylori-negative patients. Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Results (Part 3)

severity of gastritisTo determine the impact of the severity of gastritis on the surface hydrophobicity measurements, the mean contact angle was compared in groups of patients with normal histology and those with different grades of gastritis based on antral histology. There was no significant difference (P=0.599, one-way ANOVA) between the groups. In addition, when both the factors of gastritis and the infecting H pylori strain were considered, their interaction had no significant effect on the mean contact angle readings (P=0.368, two-way ANOVA). Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Results (Part 2)

Considering the sex of the patient, there was no significant difference (P=0.277) in the mean contact angle between males (62.4±2.2°, n=42) and females (66.1±2.4°, n=57). To evaluate the effect of age on gastric mucosal hydrophobicity, patients were divided into three age groups that reflected the age distribution in the entire study group: group I, 40 years of age or younger; group II, 41 to 64 years of age and group III, 65 years of age and older. Read more »

Human gastric mucosal hydrophobicity and Helicobacter pylori infection: Results (Part 1)

H pylori-positiveOf the 99 patients studied, 69 were H pylori-negative and 30 were H pylori-positive; of these 30, 10 were cagA+, 18 were cagA- and two were undetermined. Nine patients had atrophic gastritis, of which six were infected with cagA+. The mean contact angle for the 99 patients was 64.5±0.8°, with values ranging from 21.0° to 127.8°. When patients were classified according to H pylori infection, there was no significant difference (P=0.16) in contact angle between H pylori-positive (61±2.9°, n=30) and H pylori-negative patients (66±2.0°, n=69). Read more »

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